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10/24/2016 6:40:00 PM  

Try Purdys' new Banoffee, inspired by a classic!

Keira Knightley’s character in the film Love Actually (like Banoffee Pie, it’s another British triumph) attempts to extend an olive branch to another character by way of tasty pastry.

We’ve all been there, and Banoffee Pie is probably of the best ways to bribe someone—but you didn’t hear it from us.

You can find hundreds, if not thousands, of Banoffee Pie recipes online and it’s now a dessert that’s famous worldwide.

But what exactly is Banoffee Pie?

Well, it’s an English dessert (hail, Britannia!) comprised of a crumb or pastry base, a toffee filling, and topped with fresh bananas and whipped cream. The pie is often garnished with additional caramel sauce or chocolate shavings and, if you’re feeling particularly sinful, custard or ice cream.

Banoffee Pie (originally spelled Banoffi Pie) was invented in 1971 at The Hungry Monk Restaurant in East Sussex by chef Ian Dowding, with some help and encouragement from the restaurant’s owner Nigel Mackenzie.

But back to our Banoffee, which packs just as much of a flavourful punch as the original.

You can enjoy it on its own or as part of an utterly epic cookie sandwich:


For cookie dough:

  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/4 cups oatmeal

For filling:


  • Preheat over at 350°F
  • Cream together butter and sugar.
  • Add remaining cookie dough ingredients and mix until blended.
  • Roll into 1 inch balls or use a scoop. Flatten dough slightly.
  • Place on pan lined with parchment paper.
  • Bake for about 10 minutes or until golden.
  • Once cookies are out of the oven, turn them over with a pair of tongs.
  • Slice each Banoffee piece in half and place on one half of the cookies. The heat from the cookies should slightly melt the Banoffee. If not, warm cookies in microwave slightly.
  • Slice banana onto the other half of the cookies.
  • Squish the cookie sides together to make a Banana Banoffee sandwich!

10/4/2016 7:22:00 PM  

No question about it, the cocoa bean is the best bean in the world (sorry, coffee lovers, real talk).

We found out some epic trivia about cocoa beans while researching Aztec drinking chocolate recipes.

Make yourself a mug of Purdys’ Aztec Spiced Hot Chocolate and read up on these cool facts about cocoa:

Ancient South American cultures, like the Mayans and the Aztecs, mention cocoa as part of their creation myth—cocoa was a gift from the gods. This actually inspired the cocoa tree’s scientific name Theobroma cacao, which literally translates to “Food of the Gods”.

Originally, chocolate was strictly a ceremonial drink. Cocoa beans were fermented, roasted and ground into a paste to be mixed with water and spices to create xocolatl (‘bitter water’).

The Spanish conquistadors took chocolate back to Europe and tweaked the recipe by adding sugar.

Soon enough, enterprising bakers took an interest in the actual cocoa beans.

In 1828, at the height of the Industrial Revolution, inventor Van Houton created the cocoa press, which separated cocoa powder from cocoa solids. Chocolate bars became a thing, and the demand for raw cocoa was such that cocoa trees (originally from South America) were planted near the equator in regions such as Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon and Nigeria.

Want to know where Purdys’ cocoa comes from? We purchase only from 100% sustainable sources that benefit cocoa farmers and the environment. Check out Purdys’ Sustainable Cocoa Program.

8/19/2016 7:00:00 PM  

Once again, our chocolatiers have come up with a winning recipe.

Yes, our chocolatiers don’t just invent incredible chocolates, they also invent the recipes to go with them. It’s a talent.

The most recent recipe we’ve come up with is our Grilled Pineapple with Tequila Chili Pepper Chocolate Sauce. It’s a bit of a mouthful to say but you can bet it’s a mouthful to enjoy!

In fact, it’s the kind of recipe that’ll make you want to buy an indoor grill (if you don’t already have one) and make this recipe pretty much every weekend (why not?).

Here’s the recipe to make and share:

1. Peel and slice one whole pineapple into quarter inch rounds.

2. On barbecue heated to high, grill pineapple slices for about 5 minutes on each side.

3. Whisk together 1/4 whipping cream, 6 pieces of Chili Pepper chocolate, 1 oz of orange juice and 2 oz of tequila until melted and smoothly blended together.

4. Drizzle sauce over grilled pineapple and done!

7/28/2016 6:34:00 PM  

Feeling the heat this summer?

Cool down with an original recipe from Purdys’ creative chocolatiers.

You see, we’re not just about creating epic chocolates. Once in a while, we love coming up with satisfying drink recipes or show-stopping entrees.

Inspired by the heat and happiness of summer, we’ve come up with—drum roll, please—Chococado Pops, a delightfully simple recipe that combines Hedgehogs, avocados, bananas and milk.

Here’s the recipe (makes 4 ridiculously yummy treats!) for you to share, pin, fave, like, retweet and enjoy!

1. Heat 1/2 cup of milk for 1 minute in the microwave.

2. Whisk 4 Purdys Hedgehogs into the milk.

3. Peel and pit 1 avocado.

4. Peel and slice 1 banana.

5. Blend chocolate mixture, avocado and banana in blender until smooth.

6. Pour into popsicle moulds and freeze

6/30/2016 2:37:00 PM  

maple syrup

Sorry Beavers, Justin Bieber and actors whose first name is Ryan, you just don’t make the cut.

Maple Syrup is the most Canadian symbol out there.

And as Canada’s chocolatier, you can bet we love creatively using maple syrup in our chocolates.

Like our Brown Butter Maple Caramels.

Or Mini Maple Caramels.

Or Canadian Maple Toffee.

Want the full list? Sure you do.

There’s no official story on how or when maple syrup was first invented, but we can all agree that, like chocolate, it’s one of the sweetest inventions in the world.

Historica Canada explains that early French settlers in Eastern Canada learned about maple sap from local First Nations People, and the process of making maple syrup is pretty straightforward and hasn’t changed. You boil maple sap in a pot until it’s reduced to a thick syrup.

So there’s a little bit of Canadian history for you, just in time for you to win the Canada Day trivia game at your house.

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