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White Silk

5.0

1105 Wellington Rd.
London ON N6E 1V4
White Oaks Mall

0

Assorted Snack Collection - White Chocolate

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Classic Bar - White Chocolate
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5.0

Nutty Mac White - Twos
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5.0

Reduced!
Wooly Lamb - White Chocolate

0

Reduced!
Bunny Lollipop - White Chocolate

0

White Smiley Fundraiser - 50 Lollies 1 Case / 50 Lollies

0

New!
Cookie Crunch Bar
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2.0

Tiramisu Truffle

4.0

In Shop Only
Ice Cream Bar

0

Rainbow Explosion
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5.0

Classic Nines
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5.0

Pistachio Cranberry Bark

0

Canada 150 Gift Tin

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Vancouver Gift Box

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Edmonton Gift Box

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Ottawa Gift Box

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Toronto Gift Box

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Victoria Gift Box

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Calgary Gift Box

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Online Only
Sparkling and Roses

0

Canada 150 Gift Box

0

New!
Sake + Sakura

5.0

Canada 150 Gold Favour, Hand-Tied Ribbon
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Canada Gift Box

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Pear Lemon Caramel

5.0

Cowboy Hat
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0

Chocolate Tulip - Red
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Chocolate Tulip - Pink
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Chocolate Daisy - Yellow
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Chocolate Daisy - Orange
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of 48 Results

Related Content

Cherry Pickings: The inspiration for Sake + Sakura
We don't know about you but we think it's never officially Spring until we see cherry blossoms.And good news, even if cherry blossoms haven't come into season where you are, you can now taste them in...you guessed it, Sake + Sakura.Sakura is the Japanese word for cherry blossoms, and they’re the symbolic flowers of Spring, renewal and new beginnings. In Japan, cherry blossom parties are held with friends and family, where everyone enjoys a potluck under cherry blossoms. This custom is called hanami, which literally means “watching blossoms,” and it can be traced back at least a thousand years.Sake (pronounced sah-keh) dates back to the 3rd century and is a Japanese fermented rice wine with an aroma that’s been described as fruity, nutty and caramel-like. There are several different types of sake as specified by the Japanese government. Sake is usually served chilled (at about the same temperature as white wine) but it can also be served warmed up, depending on the type of sake. The sake we've sourced actually comes from Vancouver's famous Granville Island, from a local Japanese artisan sakemaker there.You'll find sake at most hanami parties, especially in Japan, so grab a picnic blanket, some friends, Sake + Sakura to share and enjoy the cherry blossoms.And if you want to learn more about how Sake + Sakura got its gorgeous speckled look (the natural way!), read our blog post about the incredibly cool Cocoa Butter Spraying Process.
Matcha, Matcha Man: How matcha green tea became a thing
If you’ve been by our website or a shop recently, you might have spotted Matcha.Our take on matcha is a creamy ganache crafted with real matcha green tea powder, butter and white chocolate (made from only 100% sustainable cocoa) inside a milk chocolate shell.But what exactly is matcha, how’s it different than other teas and why is our chocolatier Rachel McKinley excited to creatively craft chocolate confections using matcha?Matcha and regular green tea come from the same tea plant, Camellia sinensis, native to China. But sometime in the early part of the 12th century, Japanese Zen Buddhist monks brought back from China a new kind of tea: one that had been steamed and ground into a fine powder.In other words, matcha.And while matcha became less and less popular in China, it became a staple of meditation for Zen Buddhist monks and then a favourite of the warrior class and the Shogun rulers. Today, matcha is essential for tea ceremonies throughout Japan, and around the world it has gained in popularity as an ingredient in both sweet and savoury dishes.Matcha tea leaves are prepared in a special way. A few weeks before harvesting, the tea bushes are protected from direct sunlight with cloths, and these shaded conditions stimulate the plant to create more chlorophyll and amino acids, deepening the flavour of the tea leaves.Whole leaves are expertly picked, steamed to preserve the colour and nutrients, then dried, deveined and destemmed. The leaves that are deemed ideal for matcha tea are known as tencha.Tencha is ground into a fine powder in a very slow, gentle process done with large granite wheels. The process is done this way to avoid scorching the leaves. That fine powder is called matcha, literally “ground tea”.Matcha has a strong, robust umami flavour that plays really well with cocoa. Have a taste.