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Groovy, Baby: Check out Purdys’ fab take on Banoffee Pie
Keira Knightley’s character in the film Love Actually (like Banoffee Pie, it’s another British triumph) attempts to extend an olive branch to another character by way of tasty pastry.We’ve all been there, and Banoffee Pie is probably of the best ways to bribe someone—but you didn’t hear it from us.You can find hundreds, if not thousands, of Banoffee Pie recipes online and it’s now a dessert that’s famous worldwide.But what exactly is Banoffee Pie? Well, it’s an English dessert (hail, Britannia!) comprised of a crumb or pastry base, a toffee filling, and topped with fresh bananas and whipped cream. The pie is often garnished with additional caramel sauce or chocolate shavings and, if you’re feeling particularly sinful, custard or ice cream.Banoffee Pie (originally spelled Banoffi Pie) was invented in 1971 at The Hungry Monk Restaurant in East Sussex by chef Ian Dowding, with some help and encouragement from the restaurant’s owner Nigel Mackenzie.But back to our Banoffee, which packs just as much of a flavourful punch as the original.You can enjoy it on its own or as part of an utterly epic cookie sandwich:Ingredients:For cookie dough:1 cup butter1 cup sugar1 1/2 cups flour3/4 cup shredded coconut1 tsp baking soda1 tsp baking powder1/2 cup brown sugar1 egg1 1/4 cups oatmealFor filling:Purdys' Banoffee1 large bananaInstructions:Preheat over at 350°FCream together butter and sugar.Add remaining cookie dough ingredients and mix until blended.Roll into 1 inch balls or use a scoop. Flatten dough slightly.Place on pan lined with parchment paper.Bake for about 10 minutes or until golden.Once cookies are out of the oven, turn them over with a pair of tongs.Slice each Banoffee piece in half and place on one half of the cookies. The heat from the cookies should slightly melt the Banoffee. If not, warm cookies in microwave slightly.Slice banana onto the other half of the cookies.Squish the cookie sides together to make a Banana Banoffee sandwich!
Sayoubakro Primary School Expansion in Côte d’Ivoire
A few months back, one of our shop managers in Ontario reached out to me with a great idea.She wondered if we could buy books and send them to children in our cocoa farming communities. What a phenomenal idea!I contacted Cocoa Horizons (one of our Sustainable Cocoa partners on the ground) and they suggested the Sayoubakro Primary School in Sassandra, southern Côte d’Ivoire. The school had recently expanded its classroom capacity, and 1 of the 3 new classrooms had space for a library—which made the school the best place to begin our library initiatives. Sayoubakro is also one of the first schools we helped fund through Purdys’ Sustainable Cocoa Program.The school needed $2500 to purchase government-recommended books, build shelving and cupboards to house the books, and also set up a paper cataloging system.Our teams in the shops, factory kitchen and support office worked very hard on employee-led fundraising events to raise the money: bake sales, barbecues, bottles drives…it’s a long and very amazing list!In the end, we not only met our goal of $2500 but exceeded it by $1000 for a grand total of $3500.The money raised went towards the purchase of books and didactic materials (i.e. teaching materials designed to instruct and educate) and built-in shelving units. The school has also set up onsite reading sessions which occur every Wednesday as well as a new loaning system which is monitored by one of the school’s teachers.To me, this really goes to show that no matter who or where we are, we can come together and make a huge difference to someone. I couldn’t be prouder of everyone at Purdys who made the library at Sayoubakro possible.
The real Magic Beans: How cocoa took over the world
No question about it, the cocoa bean is the best bean in the world (sorry, coffee lovers, real talk).We found out some epic trivia about cocoa beans while researching Aztec drinking chocolate recipes.Make yourself a mug of Purdys’ Aztec Spiced Hot Chocolate and read up on these cool facts about cocoa:Ancient South American cultures, like the Mayans and the Aztecs, mention cocoa as part of their creation myth—cocoa was a gift from the gods. This actually inspired the cocoa tree’s scientific name Theobroma cacao, which literally translates to “Food of the Gods”. Originally, chocolate was strictly a ceremonial drink. Cocoa beans were fermented, roasted and ground into a paste to be mixed with water and spices to create xocolatl (‘bitter water’). The Spanish conquistadors took chocolate back to Europe and tweaked the recipe by adding sugar.Soon enough, enterprising bakers took an interest in the actual cocoa beans.In 1828, at the height of the Industrial Revolution, inventor Van Houton created the cocoa press, which separated cocoa powder from cocoa solids. Chocolate bars became a thing, and the demand for raw cocoa was such that cocoa trees (originally from South America) were planted near the equator in regions such as Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon and Nigeria.Want to know where Purdys’ cocoa comes from? We purchase only from 100% sustainable sources that benefit cocoa farmers and the environment. Check out Purdys’ Sustainable Cocoa Program.
Yuzu, the coolest fruit you’ve (maybe) never heard of but you definitely should
Nothing excites our chocolatiers more than funky-cool ingredients.Take Yuzu. It’s pronounced yoo-zoo and is nearly impossible to describe. Some say the flavour is a tangy mix of lemon, mandarin and grapefruit. Some say it’s more like peach, lemon and lime.Basically, it’s a citrus that’s 10x better than all the other citrus (citruses? citri?) put together.Yuzu is a hugely popular citrus in Japan, and you’ll find it used in savoury dishes and desserts. Whole Yuzu fruit or juice is even used in baths as a skin softener. Originally, Yuzu comes from China and rolled into Japan during the Tang Dynasty some 1,000 years ago, where it was used for medicinal purposes and in cooking.Yuzu is very likely a hybrid of Ichang papeda (a hardy, slow-growing citrus) and sour mandarin. Looks-wise, Yuzu is about as big as a tangerine, with a bumpy yellow-orange rind and tons of seeds inside.Over in the Western world, Yuzu is gaining popularity (watch your back, lemon!), but it’s not that easy to find yet…which didn’t stop us!We sourced fabulously tart Yuzu juice, turned it into a fun jelly layer (officially known as pâte de fruits in the business) and combined it with—what else—chocolate. Not just any chocolate. Rich dark chocolate made with 100% sustainable cocoa.And that’s the story of how a little-known citrus from Japan inspired our massively popular Yuzu Jelly Ganache. Have you tried it yet?