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Search results for "milk chocolate"

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Milk Chocolate Haystacks

5.0

Milk Chocolate Favourites
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5.0

Milk Chocolate and Almonds
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0

Milk Chocolate Classics Collection
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5.0

No Sugar Added Milk Chocolate Bar
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4.7

Classic Bar - Milk Chocolate
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5.0

Mint Meltie Bar - Milk Chocolate
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5.0

Assorted Bar Collection - Milk Chocolate

0

Sweet Georgia Browns - Milk Chocolate
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4.8

Orange Meltie Bar Milk
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5.0

Crisps and Chocolate Bar
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5.0

Peanut Butter Bar
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4.7

Coconut Fudgie Bar
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0

Chocolate Chewie Nut Bar
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5.0

Red Tote with Milk Foiled Balls

0

Painted Blossom Tin

0

Salted Hazelnut Flake
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3.8

Goat Cheese and Chardonnay Truffle

4.5

Sweet Georgia Browns - Dark Chocolate
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4.6

Mini Sweet Georgia Browns
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5.0

Peanut Butter Daisies
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5.0

Himalayan Pink Salt Caramels
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4.9

Hedgehogs - Threes
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0

Gold Coins

0

Hedgehogs - Ones
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5.0

Purdy the Pony
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0

Himalayan Pink Salt Peanut Butter
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5.0

English Toffee
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5.0

Hedgehogs
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4.8

Pear Lemon Caramel

5.0

Cowboy Hat
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0

Mini Salted Caramels, Rainbow Cylinder

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of 100 Results

Related Content

1939: The Year We Bought a Farm
As part of our 110th birthday celebration, we’re taking a look back at some historical (and historic!) moments in our Purdys timeline. The year is 1939. It’s the start of World War II and rations mean that cream and butter are in short supply.Hugh Forrester, then-owner at Purdys Chocolatier, came up with a pretty sweet workaround to the rations—by purchasing a dairy farm with 20 cows in Ladner, BC (which is about 40 minutes outside of Vancouver). Throughout the war, Purdys' chocolatiers and candy makers had fresh cream and butter daily from this farm to craft favourites that are still made today, like any of our Creams. But WWII didn’t just mean rations; it also meant supply restrictions, which meant that Purdys shops sold out of chocolates very quickly. Each day during the war, the shops would open at exactly noon and customers could only purchase one pound of chocolates each. There were line-ups around the block, and we usually sold out of chocolates within half an hour of opening.Evelyn Powell, a Purdys fan who lived in Edmonton during WWII and came to Vancouver with her friend on a mission to find lumber (as Alberta was experiencing a lumber shortage at the time), remembers: “One day we saw a line-up on Granville Street. In those days, when you saw a line-up, you got into it. If you didn’t need what was offered, someone you knew did.‘What is on,’ we asked. No one knew. As the line moved on, people came by waving their parcels. ‘Chocolates’, they smiled. ‘Purdys chocolates, in boxes.’ We let out a scream. We hadn’t seen a box of chocolates in months! We each got a box, and went back to Purdys every day and stood in the line-up.When we went back to Edmonton, it was with seven boxes each and some lumber. We were really proud of ourselves.” And the farm with 20 cows in Ladner? It got sold after the war ended in 1945.Next up, we’re time travelling to the 60s. Specifically 1963, which is when milk chocolate became a thing at Purdys.
1963: The Year We Got Milk (Chocolate)
As part of our 110th birthday celebration, we’re taking a look back at some historical (and historic!) moments in our Purdys timeline. In 1993, American advertising agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners came up with the now-iconic “Got milk” slogan for the dairy industry, which is said to be the most remembered tagline ever in the beverage industry.But that’s not where our story starts. We’re going back 30 years earlier, to 1963, when Purdys customers were saying ‘got milk chocolate’? The answer was no, actually. Purdys chocolates were crafted using only dark chocolate until Charles Flavelle, then-owner of Purdys Chocolatier, introduced milk chocolate to our lineup that same year. Already popular in Eastern Canada, milk chocolate proved to be a very, ahem, sweet idea. Milk chocolate is typically made from the same ingredients as dark chocolate (cocoa powder, cocoa butter, sugar, soya lecithin—an emulsifier—and vanillin, an extract of the vanilla bean) and one extra ingredient: milk. The percentage of cocoa powder and cocoa butter also makes a difference. Dark chocolate generally has a higher percentage of both, often giving it more of a bittersweet taste. Ghana, one of our Single Origin Bars, has a 45% cocoa content, so it’s often described as a deeper milk chocolate.And, of course, we had to take our “regular” milk chocolate even further—ours is actually a special blend of milk, dark and white chocolate together to create a memorable, uniquely Purdys taste.What’s next in our time-travel itinerary? The 80s and ice cream (baby).
We did it (and we're not done!)
I know I speak for everyone at Purdys Chocolatier when I say that we're all incredibly proud of the results of our Clean Water Project, where $2 from the sale of each Clean Water Project chocolate bar went towards raising funds for LifeStraw Community water filters. We launched the program just a few short weeks ago, on April 3rd, and it's specifically focused on raising funds for LifeStraw Community filters to be distributed in cocoa-growing co-ops that are part of the Purdys Sustainable Cocoa Program. Our Sustainable Cocoa Program itself continues to support our cocoa-growing co-ops around the world by providing our farmer partners with better wages, medical care and community programs that help to raise the standard of living for themselves, their families and their communities.LifeStraw Community filters, made by Swiss company Vestergaard Frandsen, are award-winning devices that are easy to use and provide clean, safe drinking water without the use of any chemicals, electricity or other special treatments. These filters remove 99.9% of bacteria, viruses and protozoan (disease-causing) parasites—which means that fewer children miss school because of illness from dirty water or because they must fetch water from places that aren't easily accessible.Just one LifeStraw Community filter provides safe, clean drinking water for about 60 children for three whole years. We initially hoped to raise enough funds for 35 LifeStraw Community water filters. But thanks to your enthusiatic support of the Clean Water Project, we've already met our goal...and we're going to keep going.We want to see how many more LifeStraw Community water filters we can fundraise for, so we're hard at work at our Factory Kitchen crafting more Clean Water Project bars (milk chocolate with crunchy salted butter toffee pieces).Thank you for your continued support and for helping make clean water possible in rural cocoa-growing communities.Sincerely,PeterPeter Higgins, President & Chocolate Scientist at Purdys Chocolatier