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of 52 Results
Classic Bar - Milk Chocolate
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4.7

Classic Bar - Dark Chocolate
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5.0

Assorted Bar Collection - Milk Chocolate

0

Mint Meltie Bar - Dark Chocolate
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5.0

Marshmallow Bar
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5.0

Caramel Marshmallow Bar
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3.3

Mint Meltie Bar - Milk Chocolate
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5.0

Assorted Bar Collection - Milk & Dark Chocolate

5.0

Assorted Snack Collection - White Chocolate

0

Assorted Bar Collection - Dark Chocolate

0

Orange Meltie Bar Milk
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4.0

Orange Meltie Bar Dark
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0

Classic Bar - 88% Dark Chocolate
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5.0

Marzipan Bar - Dark Chocolate
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5.0

Crisps and Chocolate Bar
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5.0

Peanut Butter Bar
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4.7

Coconut Fudgie Bar
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5.0

Milk Chocolate and Almonds
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0

Chocolate Chewie Nut Bar
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5.0

No Sugar Added Dark Chocolate Bar
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0

Chocolate Survival Kit

0

Bar Bag

0

BEST VALUE
Classic Nines
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5.0

Classic Bar - 70% Dark Chocolate
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0

Blueberry Almond Bar - 70% Dark Chocolate
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5.0

Goji Bar - 70% Dark Chocolate
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5.0

Coffee Break Bar
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3.0

Classic Bar - White Chocolate
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5.0

Lavish Luxury

5.0

Grand Expressions

0

Chocolates For a Year

0

No Sugar Added Dark Mint Meltie Bar
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of 52 Results

Related Content

1963: The Year We Got Milk (Chocolate)
As part of our 110th birthday celebration, we’re taking a look back at some historical (and historic!) moments in our Purdys timeline. In 1993, American advertising agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners came up with the now-iconic “Got milk” slogan for the dairy industry, which is said to be the most remembered tagline ever in the beverage industry.But that’s not where our story starts. We’re going back 30 years earlier, to 1963, when Purdys customers were saying ‘got milk chocolate’? The answer was no, actually. Purdys chocolates were crafted using only dark chocolate until Charles Flavelle, then-owner of Purdys Chocolatier, introduced milk chocolate to our lineup that same year. Already popular in Eastern Canada, milk chocolate proved to be a very, ahem, sweet idea. Milk chocolate is typically made from the same ingredients as dark chocolate (cocoa powder, cocoa butter, sugar, soya lecithin—an emulsifier—and vanillin, an extract of the vanilla bean) and one extra ingredient: milk. The percentage of cocoa powder and cocoa butter also makes a difference. Dark chocolate generally has a higher percentage of both, often giving it more of a bittersweet taste. Ghana, one of our Single Origin Bars, has a 45% cocoa content, so it’s often described as a deeper milk chocolate.And, of course, we had to take our “regular” milk chocolate even further—ours is actually a special blend of milk, dark and white chocolate together to create a memorable, uniquely Purdys taste.What’s next in our time-travel itinerary? The 80s and ice cream (baby).
c1985: The Time We Introduced an Original
As part of our 110th birthday celebration, we’re taking a look back at some historical (and historic!) moments in our Purdys timeline. In the mid-80s, Charles Flavelle, then-owner of Purdys, received a tip from a mall manager who wanted ice cream sold in the mall. The manager didn’t want a separate business to sell the ice cream, instead looking for a confectionery shop already established in the mall to take it on.At the start, Purdys sold ice cream cones only—but Mr. Flavelle wanted to add another option: ice cream bars. So he took ice cream home, cut it into chunks and experimented with melted chocolate and different toppings until he found it.The Original.Vanilla ice cream dipped in dark chocolate and smothered in roasted almonds.Like so.You can get the Original at any Purdys shop (but not online, as it turns out you can’t easily fit an ice cream bar through a mail slot).Be sure to also try the Ultimate Ice Cream Bar (watch how it's made!), the Sprinkles Ice Cream Bar and the NEW Cookie Crunch Ice Cream Bar, which was inspired by the white chocolate Cookie Crunch BarBehold.Ice cream itself actually dates back to (at least) the 4th century B.C. and it’s believed to have been brought to Europe from China. Originally, it was ice blended with fruits, so more of a sorbet, but as people continued to experiment with flavours and ways to keep the ice cream frozen, it became what we now call ice cream.The ice cream bar was invented much, much later (in 1920) in the United States by Christian Kent Nelson, a confectionery shop owner originally from Gunstrup, Denmark. The story goes that a young customer in the shop couldn’t decide between a chocolate bar or an ice cream sandwich but only had enough money for one or the other.This gave Nelson the idea to create ice cream dipped in chocolate, and called it the “I-Scream Bar”. The name was changed to the Eskimo Bar a year later when Nelson went into partnership with chocolate maker Russell C. Stover. Where to next, time travellers? The 90s, and a certain chocolate with a lot of personality.
Matcha, Matcha Man: How matcha green tea became a thing
If you’ve been by our website or a shop recently, you might have spotted Matcha or Matcha Coconut Bar.But what exactly is matcha, how’s it different than other teas and why is our chocolatier Rachel McKinley excited to creatively craft chocolate confections using matcha?Matcha and regular green tea come from the same tea plant, Camellia sinensis, native to China. But sometime in the early part of the 12th century, Japanese Zen Buddhist monks brought back from China a new kind of tea: one that had been steamed and ground into a fine powder.In other words, matcha.And while matcha became less and less popular in China, it became a staple of meditation for Zen Buddhist monks and then a favourite of the warrior class and the Shogun rulers. Today, matcha is essential for tea ceremonies throughout Japan, and around the world it has gained in popularity as an ingredient in both sweet and savoury dishes.Matcha tea leaves are prepared in a special way. A few weeks before harvesting, the tea bushes are protected from direct sunlight with cloths, and these shaded conditions stimulate the plant to create more chlorophyll and amino acids, deepening the flavour of the tea leaves.Whole leaves are expertly picked, steamed to preserve the colour and nutrients, then dried, deveined and destemmed. The leaves that are deemed ideal for matcha tea are known as tencha.Tencha is ground into a fine powder in a very slow, gentle process done with large granite wheels. The process is done this way to avoid scorching the leaves. That fine powder is called matcha, literally “ground tea”.Matcha has a strong, robust umami flavour that plays really well with cocoa. Try it and delight yourself!
Polar Bears, Chocolates & Ice Cream, Oh My!
We’re setting up shop in Winnipeg, Manitoba at St. Vital Centre! #PurdysinthePeg. It’s a special occasion, and that calls for a few special celebratory things.Like if you’re one of the first 100 people in line on Saturday, Aug 26th (we open at 9:30am), you get a free box of some of our best-loved chocolates, all crafted from only 100% sustainable cocoa.And that day, it’s also buy 1, get 1 free on Original Ice Cream Bars.And we also have the exclusive launch of White Spruce: a dark chocolate ganache, icy fresh peppermint and the bright herbal flavour of white spruce together in a dark chocolate shell speckled with naturally coloured cocoa butter. (Not in Winnipeg? Don’t worry, White Spruce is coming to all Purdys shops soon and we’ll shout it from the treetops when it’s available.)Chocolatier Rachel McKinley, who created White Spruce, actually hails from Stonewall, Manitoba (about 25 kms from Winnipeg). She originally had plans for a career in medicine (just like Peter Higgins, President & Chocolate Scientist at Purdys Chocolatier). But one winter, she started personally fundraising with the goal of selling a couple hundred truffles for $1 each to friends and friends-of-friends. She sold 3,000 truffles and picked a new career. Rachel went on to study at Ecole Chocolat, first in their online program and then through several internships across North America, then at the Barry Callebaut Academy in Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, where she apprenticed with Master Chocolatier Julian Rose.In 2006, Rachel moved to Vancouver and joined the faculty of her alma mater Ecole Chocolat and journeyed with other chocolatiers to France and Italy to study the art of chocolate-making.And on Saturday, August 26th, Rachel will be live-sculpting a 3 ft. tall polar bear out of chocolate. Follow along on Instagram for updates and photos.
Put on your baking hats, it's World Baking Day!
It's World Baking Day today!That's a whole entire day dedicated to cookies! crumbles! pies! shortbread! cheesecake!It's also exactly 1 month and 1 day to Father's Day, so we thought we'd do something for World Baking Day and create a recipe that's a cool nod to dads everywhere.Enter Shawn Taylor, Culinary Advisor (and Photographer!) at Purdys Chocolatier. As Culinary Advisor, Shawn has created or collaborated on hundreds of both savoury and sweet recipes for Purdys, either online at purdys.com or for our special eBook collections.And as Photographer at Purdys, Shawn has also styled and shot every single one of your favourite chocolates. We know, we know, it's a sweet job and somebody's gotta do it.Shawn (that's him in the photo with his son) is the father of two impossibly adorable children, and he took inspiration from them: "I’m really into baking and cooking, and I love showing my kids how you get to enjoy something you made yourself and how it’s easy to work with chocolate when you follow the steps."Licorice Caramel Shortbread SquaresIngredients:2/3 cup + 1 tbps butter1/4 cup sugar1 1/4 cup flour, sifted10 Purdys Licorice Caramels4 Purdys Vanilla Caramels4 tbsp cream100 g Purdys Classic Dark ChocolateInstructions:Preheat oven to 350°F.Prepare a 9 inch square pan with cooking oil or line with parchment paper.In a medium bowl, use a mixer to cream 2/3 cup butter and sugar together until fluffy.Sift flour and stir it into creamed butter until mixture is evenly crumbly. Be careful not to over mix or shortbread will become tough.Press into a 9 inch square pan and bake for 20 minutes. When finished, set aside to cool.Cut caramels into quarters and melt in saucepan with cream on medium heat, stirring occasionally until melted. Be careful not to burn the mixture as the chocolate will melt quickly but the caramel will need another 1-2 minutes to melt. Continue stirring until emulsified, for another 2-3 minutes.Spread caramel onto cooled shortbread and set aside to cool.Chop dark chocolate into small pieces and melt in heatproof bowl in microwave for 20 seconds at a time until melted. Stir in 1 tbsp butter until mixture is smooth and silky.With a spoon, drizzle the chocolate on top of the caramel layer and chill for 20 minutes in fridge or for 1 hour at room temperature.Cut into 2 inch squares to serve.You can also grab the printable version of this recipe.
The real Magic Beans: How cocoa took over the world
No question about it, the cocoa bean is the best bean in the world (sorry, coffee lovers, real talk).We found out some epic trivia about cocoa beans while researching Aztec drinking chocolate recipes.Make yourself a mug of Purdys’ Aztec Spiced Hot Chocolate and read up on these cool facts about cocoa:Ancient South American cultures, like the Mayans and the Aztecs, mention cocoa as part of their creation myth—cocoa was a gift from the gods. This actually inspired the cocoa tree’s scientific name Theobroma cacao, which literally translates to “Food of the Gods”. Originally, chocolate was strictly a ceremonial drink. Cocoa beans were fermented, roasted and ground into a paste to be mixed with water and spices to create xocolatl (‘bitter water’). The Spanish conquistadors took chocolate back to Europe and tweaked the recipe by adding sugar.Soon enough, enterprising bakers took an interest in the actual cocoa beans.In 1828, at the height of the Industrial Revolution, inventor Van Houton created the cocoa press, which separated cocoa powder from cocoa solids. Chocolate bars became a thing, and the demand for raw cocoa was such that cocoa trees (originally from South America) were planted near the equator in regions such as Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon and Nigeria.Want to know where Purdys’ cocoa comes from? We purchase only from 100% sustainable sources that benefit cocoa farmers and the environment. Check out Purdys’ Sustainable Cocoa Program.
We did it (and we're not done!)
I know I speak for everyone at Purdys Chocolatier when I say that we're all incredibly proud of the results of our Clean Water Project, where $2 from the sale of each Clean Water Project chocolate bar went towards raising funds for LifeStraw Community water filters. We launched the program just a few short weeks ago, on April 3rd, and it's specifically focused on raising funds for LifeStraw Community filters to be distributed in cocoa-growing co-ops that are part of the Purdys Sustainable Cocoa Program. Our Sustainable Cocoa Program itself continues to support our cocoa-growing co-ops around the world by providing our farmer partners with better wages, medical care and community programs that help to raise the standard of living for themselves, their families and their communities.LifeStraw Community filters, made by Swiss company Vestergaard Frandsen, are award-winning devices that are easy to use and provide clean, safe drinking water without the use of any chemicals, electricity or other special treatments. These filters remove 99.9% of bacteria, viruses and protozoan (disease-causing) parasites—which means that fewer children miss school because of illness from dirty water or because they must fetch water from places that aren't easily accessible.Just one LifeStraw Community filter provides safe, clean drinking water for about 60 children for three whole years. We initially hoped to raise enough funds for 35 LifeStraw Community water filters. But thanks to your enthusiatic support of the Clean Water Project, we've already met our goal...and we're going to keep going.We want to see how many more LifeStraw Community water filters we can fundraise for, so we're hard at work at our Factory Kitchen crafting more Clean Water Project bars (milk chocolate with crunchy salted butter toffee pieces).Thank you for your continued support and for helping make clean water possible in rural cocoa-growing communities.Sincerely,PeterPeter Higgins, President & Chocolate Scientist at Purdys Chocolatier